Creating A Page Break

Page breaks allow pages in your paper to remain nice and neat.  Once you’ve added a page break to a particular part of the page, nothing will be “allowed” to spill onto the remainder of that page.  Because students often need to export their papers into different formats, work that appears neat to the student will look sloppy to the professor.  This is especially true when submitting work through services like Turnitin that re-format your paper or Waypoint.

Page breaks are particularly helpful on a title page or an abstract page.  Follow the simple instructions below to create your own page breaks:

 In Microsoft Word 2010:

  • Click Page layout in the menu bar.
  • In the Page Setup section, click Breaks.
  • Select Page.

 In Microsoft Word 2013:

  • Click Page Layout from the menu bar.
  • In the Page Setup section, click Breaks.
  • Select Page.

 In Apple’s Pages:

  • Click Insert from the menu bar.
  • Select Page Break.

 In Microsoft Word 2011 for Mac

  • Click Insert from the menu bar.
  • Select Break.
  • Select Page Break.

When to use Page Breaks in APA format

Any time you need to separate one section of your paper from the next, using a page break is the best tool to use.  The most obvious examples of this are after the last line of your title page (usually the date), press the return key once, then create a page break using the steps above.  Another time you will always want to use a page break is after the last line of your paper, before your reference page.  I commonly see references spill back onto the last page of the body of the paper.  Always create a page break after the last line of your paper.

Other times to use a page break are if you include charts or graphs at the end of your paper.  The APA Manual states that there should be 1 graph or chart per page.  After the chart or graph, press the return key so that your cursor is below the graph and insert a page break.

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